Honesty doesn’t always pay - the role of honesty of accounts for success made in an educational setting in inferences of modesty and arrogance.

Hareli, S. Weiner, B. & Yee J. (2006). Honesty doesn’t always pay - the role of honesty of accounts for success made in an educational setting in inferences of modesty and arrogance. Social Psychology of Education, 9, 119-138.

Previous research has documented that attributional information contained in causal accounts for success induce impressions of arrogance and modesty. The research further examined the role of accounts as well as level of success when perceivers know the real reason for success. Two studies of university students revealed that honesty strongly decreases arrogance and increases modesty in the case of effort accounts, and not in situations of communicated ability. In addition, honesty was determined not only by the truth value of an account but also by the extent to which the account induced impressions of arrogance and modesty. The present findings provide further understanding of the link between attributional information and social judgments.



(My publication)Posted: Wednesday, May 27, 2009 by shareli
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