Caitlin Koford


Graduate Student

University of Chicago

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Recent Publications
Suffering and Soul‐Making: Rethinking John Hick’s Theodicy
The Journal of Religion, Vol. 90, pp. 313–334 By Mark S. M. Scott John Hick transformed the shape of thinking about theodicy in contemporary philosophical theology with his conception of the world as a “vale of soul‐making.” Suffering, he argues, enables our development as spiritually and morally...
History, Philosophy, and Ethics of Biology
The Quarterly Review of Biology, vol. 85, no. 2 By Stephen G. Post Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–1895) delivered his most famous lecture, Evolution and Ethics , in 1893 at Oxford University. It remains one of the most penetrating and original statements on Darwinian thought in relation to the moral life...
Empathy, Perspective Taking And Personal Values As Predictors Of Moral Schemas
Journal of Moral Education, Volume 39, Issue 2, pages 213 - 233 By Liisa Myyrya, Soile Juujaumlrvi and Kaija Pesso The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships between empathy variables, personal values and moral reasoning. The impact of empathic concern, perspective taking and personal values measured by...
Levels Of Moralisation: A New Conception Of Moral Sensitivity
Journal of Moral Education, Volume 39, Issue 2, pages 175 - 189 By Benjamin J. Lovett and Alexander H. Jordan Moral sensitivity has generally been interpreted in a normative sense, as the ability to notice moral features present in a situation. This paper outlines an alternative, descriptive conception of moral sensitivity...
Kant's Contribution to Moral Education: The Relevance of Catechistics
Journal of Moral Education, Volume 39, Issue 2, pages 165 - 174. By Chris W. Surprenant Kant's deontological ethics, along with Aristotle's virtue ethics and Mill's utilitarian ethics, is often identified as one of the three primary moral options between which individuals can choose. Given the importance...
Tradition and Truth: The Ethics of Lawmaking in Tannaitic Literature
Volume 100, Number 2, pp. 223-243 (Article) By Tzvi Novick This article examines aspects of "scholastic" ethics in tannaitic literature, in particular, the notion that one who is engaged in legal discussion should readily admit ignorance, and should concede to the truth. While centering...
The Anthropocentric Paradigm and the Posibility of Animal Ethics
Ethics & the Environment, Volume 15, Number 1, pp. 27-50 By Elisa Aaltola Animal ethics has tended to follow an analytical approach and has focused much attention on moral reason and theory. Recently, some have argued this to be a fundamental problem. The 'paradigmatic account' claims that instead of...
Interspecies Etiquette: An Ethics of Paying Attention to Animals
Ethics & the Environment, Volume 15, Number 1, pp. 101-121 By Traci Warkentin This paper explores a philosophical praxis of paying attention, and the importance of bodily comportment, in human-animal interactions. It traces some of the beginnings of the notion of attentiveness as it has arisen in contemporary...
Aquinas on Compassion: Has He Something to Offer Today?
Irish Theological Quarterly, Vol. 75, No. 2, 157-174 By Thomas Ryan 'Compassion’—an engaging yet troublesome word? Recent studies on Thomas Aquinas prompt a reconsideration of the place of compassion as an emotion and a virtue in his treatment of the Christian moral life. Through an analysis of relevant...
Educating Moral Emotions or Moral Selves: A false dichotomy?
Educational Philosophy and Theory, Volume 42, Issue 4, pp. 397 - 409 By K ristján K ristjánsson In the post-Kohlbergian era of moral education, a 'moral gap' has been identified between moral cognition and moral action. Contemporary moral psychologists lock horns over how this gap might be bridged. The two main...
The Relationship Between Empathy-Related Constructs and Care-Based Moral Development in Young Adulthood
Journal of Moral Education, Volume 39, Issue 2, pages 191 - 211 By Eva E. A. Skoe This study examined the link between care-based moral reasoning and three different aspects of empathy—perspective taking, sympathy and personal distress. Participants were 30 female and 28 male students, ranging in age from 20 to 42...
“End-Of-Life” Biases In Moral Evaluations Of Others
Cognition Volume 115, Issue 2, Pages 343-349 By George E. Newman, Kristi L. Lockhart and Frank C. Keil When evaluating the moral character of others, people show a strong bias to more heavily weigh behaviors at the end of an individual’s life, even if those behaviors arise in light of an overwhelmingly...
Deliberating and Doing Ethics in Body Gifting Practices
Current Sociology, Vol. 58, No. 3, pp. 443-462 By Rhonda Shaw This article mobilizes accounts of the phenomenology of ethical expertise to discuss the actions and experiences of people who have participated in body gifting practices. The body gifting practices specifically addressed in the study are...
The Rationality of Ultimate Concern: Moral Exemplars, Theological Ethics, and the Science of Moral Cognition
Theology and Science, Volume 8, Issue 2, pages 139 - 161 By Gregory R. Peterson, Michael Spezio, James Van Slyke, Kevin Reimer and Warren Brown This paper argues that consideration of moral exemplars may provide a means for integrating insights across philosophical ethics, theological ethics, and the scientific...
The Ethics of Confucius and Aristotle: Mirrors of Virtue (review)
Philosophy East and West, Volume 60, Number 2,pp. 303-306. By Christian Helmut Wenzel The Ethics of Confucius and Aristotle: Mirrors of Virtue by Jiyuan Yu offers an introductory comparison in overview between Confucian and Aristotelian understandings of virtue. By "Confucian ethics" Yu means, in a...
The Art of Doing Good: Charity in Late Ming China (review)
The American Historical Review, Volume 115, Issue 2, Page 514–515. By Helen Dunstan The importance of private philanthropy in premodern China has long been recognized by historians, but for monographs on the subject one has had to turn to works in East Asian languages. Joanna Handlin Smith's The Art of Doing Good...
Consumer Identity Work as Moral Protagonism: How Myth and Ideology Animate a Brand‐Mediated Moral Conflict
Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 36, DOI: 10.1086/644761. By Marius K. Luedicke, Craig J. Thompson and Markus Giesler Consumer researchers have tended to equate consumer moralism with normative condemnations of mainstream consumer culture. Consequently, little research has investigated the multifaceted forms...
Review: Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship
The Journal of Religion, Vol. 90, PP. 269–272. By Richard B. Miller Eric Gregory’s Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship has two aims: first, to recast debates over modern liberalism as debates over the political implications of the Augustinian legacy and,...
Elevation Leads to Altruistic Behavior
Psychological Science, vol. 21, no. 3, p.315-320. By Simone Schnall, Jean Roper and Daniel M.T. Fessler Feelings of elevation, elicited by witnessing another person perform a good deed, have been hypothesized to motivate a desire to help others. However, despite growing interest in the determinants of...
A Student in Distress: Moral Frames and Bystander Behavior in School
The Elementary School Journal, Volume 110, Number 4. By Robert Thornberg The purpose of this study was to investigate and generate a grounded theory on how and why students behave as they do in school situations in which they witness another student in distress. Fieldwork and interviews were conducted in...
Ethics and social responsibility in Australian grocery shopping
International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, Vol 38, Issue 4, PP. 297-316. By Jasmine Williams, Juliet Memery, Philip Megicks and Mark Morrison The purpose of this paper is to identify, and explore the importance of, ethical and socially responsible (ESR) factors in Australian consumers' choices of grocery products and stores...
Ethics of Human Enhancement: 25 Questions & Answers
Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology, Vol. 4 : Iss. 1, Article 4. By Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin, James Moor and John Weckert This paper presents the principal findings from a three-year research project funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) on ethics of human enhancement technologies. To help untangle this...
A Phenomenological Study of Nurses’ Understanding of Honesty in Palliative Care
Nursing Ethics, Vol. 17, No. 1, 39-50. By Eva Erichsen, Elisabeth Hadd Danielsson and Maria Friedrichsen Honesty is essential for the care of seriously ill and dying patients. The current study aimed to describe how nurses experience honesty in their work with patients receiving palliative...
Rights, Happiness and God: A Response to Justice: Rights and Wrongs
Studies in Christian Ethics, Vol. 23, No. 2, 156-162 By Roger Crisp This paper is a discussion of some themes from Justice: Rights and Wrongs , by Nicholas Wolterstorff. The paper begins with a discussion of Wolterstorff’s distinction between justice as inherent rights and justice as inherent worth. It...
Admiration for Virtue: Neuroscientific Perspectives on A Motivating Emotion
Contemporary Educational Psychology, doi:10.1016 By Mary Helen Immordino-Yang and Lesley Sylvan Social emotions like admiration for another person’s virtue are often associated with a desire to be virtuous one’s self, and to engage in meaningful and socially relevant activities against any odds ( Haidt...
Morality or Moralism?
Common Knowledge, Volume 16, Issue 2 Several articles from the latest issue of Common Knowledge, a journal that seeks to challenge the ways in which we think of theory and its relevance to humanity, respond to Hache and Latour's recent article entitled "Morality or Moralism?"...
The Virtues of Mendacity: On Lying in Politics
University of Virginia Press By Martin Jay Review by Steven E. Levingston from The Washington Post When Michael Dukakis accused George H. W. Bush of being the “Joe Isuzu of American Politics” during the 1988 presidential campaign, he asserted in a particularly American tenor the...
Ethical Imperatives for Intervention with Elder Families
The Family Journal, Vol. 18, No. 2, 215-221 By Loretta J. Bradley, Peggy P. Whiting, Bret Hendricks and Laura S. Wheat This article discusses the ethical dilemmas common to counseling practice with elder families and describes virtue ethics, rule ethics, and principle ethics in their application...
Perceptions of Nano Ethics among Practitioners in a Developing Country: A Case of India
NanoEthics, Volume 4, Number 1 By Debasmita Patra, E. Haribabu and Katherine A. McComas Many developing countries have allocated significant amounts of funding for nanoscience and nanotechnology research, yet compared to developed countries, there has been little study, discussion...
At the Crossroads of Ethics and Aesthetics
Philosophy and Literature, Volume 34, Number 1. By Noël Carroll From Plato to Hume, few if any Western thinkers doubted that there was an intimate connection between art and ethics. Historically, most art had been in the service of the church or the state, or some other political authority, and therefore...
Virtue in Argument
Argumentation, Volume 24, Number 2, PP. 165-179. By Andrew Aberdein Virtue theories have become influential in ethics and epistemology. This paper argues for a similar approach to argumentation. Several potential obstacles to virtue theories in general, and to this new application in particular, are...
DNA Returned to Tribe, Raising Questions About Consent
Science, Vol. 328, no. 5978, p. 558 By Jennifer Couzin-Frankel A tiny tribe of Native Americans who live beneath the cliffs of the Grand Canyon is shaking up genetics research, thanks to an unusual out-of-court agreement with Arizona State University. Tribe members charged that their DNA...
Huckleberry Finn and Moral Motivation
Philosophy and Literature, Volume 34, Number 1, pp. 1-16. By Alan Goldman Huckleberry Finn is not irrational in being unmotivated to follow his explicit judgments of rightness and wrongness. Philosophers have previously judged Huck to be irrational, subject to weakness of will, in being unable to act on his...
Moral Luck in Thomas Hardy's Fiction
Philosophy and Literature, Volume 34, Number 1, pp. 82-94. By Chengping Zhang Thomas Hardy is notorious for driving his characters into the grave with untimely chance and luck. This essay interprets his idiosyncrasy as an exploration of the problem of "moral luck" to confront the reader with fundamental...
Moral Uses, Narrative Effects: Natural History in Victorian Periodicals and Elizabeth Gaskell's Wives and Daughters
Victorian Periodicals Review, Volume 43, Number 1, pp. 1-18. By Anne Dewitt This article situates Elizabeth Gaskell's Wives and Daughters, serialized in Cornhill Magazine between 1864 and 1866, in the context of contemporary periodical articles that represent natural history as a moral endeavor and that depict...
Plato's Republic in the Recent Debate
Journal of the History of Philosophy, Volume 48, Number 2, pp. 125-151. By Francesco Fronterotta Plato's Republic continues to arouse intense controversy among commentators, both for its ethical and political project and for its psychological, epistemological, and ontological implications for the knowledge of philosophers...
Forgiveness and Restoration: A Theological Exploration
The Journal of Religion, 90:148–170. By Jesse Couenhoven The discussion below contains a number of arguments about the nature of forgiveness that are inspired by my beliefs about divine forgiveness and their implications for human forgiveness. Yet these arguments do not (solely) depend on...
What is Medical Ethics?
Current Anaesthesia & Critical Care, Doi 10.1016 By Andrew D Lawson Some critics of medical ethics claim it as mere sophistry. The attempt by humans to formulate principles and codes for moral behaviour is a feature of all known civilizations. Ethics, or moral philosophy, however came about with the...
Cosmetic Genetics and Virtue-Based Restraints on Autonomy
The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 10, Issue 4. By Laurence B. McCullough There are persistent tendencies in the bioethics literature to be imprecise about what “enhancement” means, to treat genetic enhancement as ethically sui generis . “Enhancement” in general means the improvement of human anatomy...
Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Foundational Concepts
Philosophy Compass, Volume 5, Issue 4, PP. 307 - 316. By Mary I. Bockover Confucianism conceives of persons as being necessarily interdependent, defining personhood in terms of the various roles one embodies and that are established by the relationships basic to one's life. By way of contrast, the Western...
What Are Parents For?: Reproductive Ethics after the Nonidentity Problem
Hastings Center Report, Volume 40, Number 2,pp. 37-47. By Bernard G. Prusak Bioethicists often use the “nonidentity problem”—the idea that a child born with a disability would actually be a different child if she were born without the disability—to defend parents’ rights to have whatever children they want...
Pity, Empathy, and the Tragic Spectacle of Human Suffering: Exploring the Emotional Culture of Compassion in Late Ancient Christianity
Journal of Early Christian Studies, Volume 18, Number 1,pp. 1-27. By Paul M. Blowers While abundant recent studies have illuminated the social and cultural realities underlying Christian responses to poverty in late antiquity, the present essay investigates the unique challenges to Christian preachers in cultivating...
State Neutrality and the Ethics of Human Enhancement Technologies
AJOB Neuroscience, Volume 1, Issue 2, pages 41 - 48 By John Basl Robust technological enhancement of core cognitive capacities is now a realistic possibility. From the perspective of neutralism, the view that justifications for public policy should be neutral between reasonable conceptions of the good...
Toward a Sexual Ethics Curriculum: Bringing Philosophy and Society to Bear on Individual Development
Harvard Educational Review, Volume 80, Number 1, pp. 81-106 By Sharon Lamb For over a decade, battles have raged between conservative Abstinence Only Until Marriage (AOUM) sexuality education advocates and liberal Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) advocates. While these battles have focused on the inclusion...
A Confucian Reflection on Genetic Enhancement
The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 10, Issue 4, pages 62 - 70 By Ruiping Fan This essay explores a proper Confucian vision on genetic enhancement. It argues that while Confucians can accept a formal starting point that Michael Sandel proposes in his ethics of giftedness, namely, that children should be taken as...
Our Teachers Want To Be The Best: On The Necessity Of Intra-Professional Reflection About Moral Ideals Of Teaching
Teachers and Teaching, Volume 16, Issue 2, pages 207 - 218 By Doret J. de Ruyter and J. Jos Kole Teaching is a significant social good and therefore teachers as well as the state have to take responsibility for guarding the moral quality of the teaching practice. Based on this premise, the article describes and...
A Royal Road to Consequentialism?
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Volume 13, Number 2 By Martin Peterson To consequentialise a moral theory means to account for moral phenomena usually described in nonconsequentialist terms, such as rights, duties, and virtues, in a consequentialist framework. This paper seeks to show that all moral theories...
Why Information Ethics Must Begin With Virtue Ethics
Metaphilosophy, Volume 41, Issue 3, Pages 380 - 401 By Richard Volkman The information ethics (IE) of Floridi and Sanders is evaluated here in the light of an alternative in virtue ethics that is antifoundationalist, particularist, and relativist in contrast to Floridi's foundationalist, impartialist...
Being Human: Science, Knowledge and Virtue
Cambridge University Press, Vol. 45, pp. 189-202 By John Haldane In February 1997, following the announcement that the Roslin Institute in Scotland had successfully cloned a sheep (‘Dolly’) by means of cell-nuclear transfer, US President Clinton requested the National Bioethics Advisory Commission to...
Moral Complexity, The Fatal Attraction of Truthiness and the Importance of Mature Moral Functioning
Perspectives on Psychological Science, Vol.5, pp.182-184. By Darcia Narvaez Recently, intuitionist theories have been effective in capturing the academic discourse about morality. Intuitionist theories, like rationalist theories, offer important but only partial understanding of moral functioning. Both can be...
Cultural Differences Are Not Always Reducible to Individual Differences
PNAS, doi: 10.1073 By Jinkyung Na, Igor Grossmann, Michael E. W. Varnum, Shinobu Kitayama, Richard Gonzalez and Richard E. Nisbett We show that differences in social orientation and in cognition that exist between cultures and social classes do not necessarily have counterparts...
A Saint of One's Own: Emmanuel Levinas, Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, and Eulalia of Mérida
L'Esprit Créateur, Volume 50, Number 1, pp. 6-20. By Virginia Burrus Shame and sanctity are intimately related in ancient "lives" of Jewish sages and Christian ascetics. Infinitely other , saints (from Eliezer to Eulalia) are also infinitely seductive in the audacity of their willful abjection...
Philosophy as a Way of Life: Deleuze on Thinking and Money
SubStance, Volume 39, pp. 24-37. By Philip Goodchild The work of Pierre Hadot has re-established an approach to philosophy as a way of life, a set of spiritual exercises (Hadot 1995, 2002). As Socrates explained his task, "I tried to persuade each of one of you to concern himself...
Is There an Ethical Problem Here?
Hastings Center Report, Volume 40, Number 2, p. 3. By John A. Robertson Egg donation fills an important niche in American infertility practice. It helps women with ovarian failure, women over forty, and gay men to have children. It does so, to a large extent, because donors are paid for their services...
The Very Idea of a Judge
University of Toronto Law Journal, Volume 60, Number 1, pp. 61-80. ByDavid Dyzenhaus "I argue that we cannot have legal order without judges who have an understanding of legal principles that transcends the law of their land. But this is an understanding of the principles of legality, rather than of the moral content...
Medical Education as Moral Formation: An Aristotelian Account of Medical Professionalsim
Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, Volume 53, Number 1, pp. 87-105. By Warren A. Kinghorn The medical professionalism movement, bolstered by many influential medical organizations and institutions, has in the last decade produced a number of conceptual definitions of professionalism and a number of concrete proposals...
A Virtue Ethical Account of Making Decisions About Risk
Journal of Risk Research, Volume 13, pp. 217 - 230. By Nafsika Athanassoulis and Allison Ross Most discussions of risk are developed in broadly consequentialist terms, focusing on the outcomes of risks as such. This paper will provide an alternative account of risk from a virtue ethical perspective, shifting...
Cutting God in Half - And Putting the Pieces Together Again, A New Approach to Philosophy
Pentire Press By Nicholas Maxwell "This book will enthral anyone concerned about ultimate questions – the nature of the universe, the meaning of life, the fate of humanity. It is written in a lively, accessible style, and has original things to say about a number...
A Theory of Virtue: Introductory Remarks
Philosophical Studies, Volume 148, Number 1. By Robert Marrihew Adams What is virtue? A plausible first answer is that virtue is goodness of moral character. The theory of virtue proposed in my book, A Theory of Virtue (Adams 2006 ), belongs to the department of ethical theory that is concerned...
The Smell of Virtue, Clean Scents Promote Reciprocity and Charity
Psychological Science, Volume 21, Number 3, PP. 381-383. By Katie Liljenquist, Chen-Bo Zhong and Adam D. Galinsky. Given the symbolic association between physical and moral purity, we considered a provocative possibility: In addition to regulating physical cleanliness, clean smells might also motivate virtuous...
That "Ought" Does Not Imply "Right": Why It Matters for Virtue Ethics
The Southern Journal of Philosophy, Volume 46 Issue 2, PP 299 - 315. By Daniel C. Russell Virtue ethicists sometimes say that a right action is what a virtuous person would do, characteristically, in the circumstances. But some have objected recently that right action cannot be defined as what a virtuous person would do...
Courage in The Analects: A Genealogical Survey of the Confucian Virtue of Courage
Frontiers of Philosophy in China, Volume 5, Number 1. By Lisheng Chen The different meanings of “courage” in The Analects were expressed in Confucius’ remark on Zilu’s bravery. The typological analysis of courage in Mencius and Xunzi focused on the shaping of the personalities of brave persons. “Great courage...
Sharing
Journal of Consumer Research, Inc. Vol. 36 By Russell Belk. Sharing is a fundamental consumer behavior that we have either tended to overlook or to confuse with commodity exchange and gift giving. Sharing is a distinct, ancient, and increasingly vital consumer research topic that bears on a broad...
The Inherent Limitations on Human Freedom
Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture, Volume 13, Number 1, pp. 107-131. By James M. Jacobs That the essence of human nature is to be free is a common theme of many otherwise disparate philosophical traditions. From Augustine to Sartre, the fact of human freedom has been the point of departure for the consideration of humanity...
Moral Distress: A Growing Problem in the Health Professions?
Hastings Center Report, Volume 40, Number 1, pp. 20-22. By Connie M. Ulrich, Ann B. Hamric and Christine Grady. In the insightful and provocative book Final Exam, noted author and liver transplant surgeon Pauline Chen chronicles her medical education and some of the ethical dilemmas physicians face in practice...
Blaming the Parts Instead of the Person: Understanding and Applying Neurobiological Factors Associated with Psychopathy
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Volume 52, Number 1, pp. 29-53. By Lauren F. Freedman and Simon N. Verdun-Jones. This article examines the implications of the body of research that asserts that psychopaths have neurobiological irregularities that are manifested by learning and fear-processing deficits as well as neurotransmitter...
Virtue Ethics and Virtue Epistemology
Metaphilosophy, volume 41, pp. 22 - 40. By Roger Crisp The aim of this essay is to test the claim that epistemologists—virtue epistemologists in particular—have much to learn from virtue ethics. The essay begins with an outline of virtue ethics itself. This section concludes that a pure form...
Virtues, Social Roles, and Contextualism
Metaphilosophy, volume 41, pp. 95 - 114. By Sarah Wright Contextualism in epistemology has been proposed both as a way to avoid skepticism and as an explanation for the variability found in our use of "knows." When we turn to contextualism to perform these two functions, we should...
From Empathy to Denial: Arab Responses to the Holocaust (review)
Journal of Jewish Identities, Issue 3, Number 1, pp. 86-88. By Daniel H. Magilow. In June 2009, when American President Barack Obama delivered a long-awaited speech about the United States' relationship to the Muslim world at Cairo University, The New York Times invited several young Egyptian and Jordanian...
Human Nature
Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures (1970), volume 4, pp.1-13. By Peter Winch. The concept of human nature usually enters discussions of the nature and implications of the social sciences in connection with one or another form of ‘relativism’. Confronted with the enormous and apparently conflicting variety of phenomena...
Exemplarist Virtue Theory
Metaphilosophy, volume 41, Issue 1-2, Pp.41 - 57. By Linda Zagzebski In this essay I outline a radical kind of virtue theory I call exemplarism, which is foundational in structure but which is grounded in exemplars of moral goodness, direct reference to which anchors all the moral concepts in the theory...
Right Act, Virtuous Motive
Metaphilosophy Volume 41, Issue 1-2, Pp. 58 - 72. By Thomas Hurka The concepts of virtue and right action are closely connected, in that we expect people with virtuous motives to at least often act rightly. Two well-known views explain this connection by defining one of the concepts in terms of the other...
Virtue, Emotion, and Attention
Metaphilosophy, Volume 41, Issue 1-2, Pp. 115 - 131. By Michael S. Brady The perceptual model of emotions maintains that emotions involve, or are at least analogous to, perceptions of value. On this account, emotions purport to tell us about the evaluative realm, in much the same way that sensory perceptions...
Feeling Without Thinking: Lessons from the Ancients on Emotion and Virtue-Acquisition
Metaphilosophy, Volume 41, Issue 1-2, Pp. 132 - 151. By Amy Coplan By briefly sketching some important ancient accounts of the connections between psychology and moral education, I hope to illuminate the significance of the contemporary debate on the nature of emotion and to reveal its stakes. I begin the...
A Challenge to Intellectual Virtue From Moral Virtue: The Case of Universal Love
Metaphilosophy, Volume 41, Issue 1-2, Pp. 152 - 171. By Christine Swanton On the Aristotelian picture of virtue, moral virtue has at its core intellectual virtue. An interesting challenge for this orthodoxy is provided by the case of universal love and its associated virtues, such as the dispositions to...
Duties and Virtues
Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement , Volume 35, PP. 107-120. By Onora O'Neill Duty and virtue are no longer the common coin of daily conversation. Both terms strike many of us as old-fashioned and heavy handed. Yet we incessantly talk about what ought and ought not to be done, and about the sorts of persons...
Making Darwin: Biography and the Changing Representations of Charles Darwin
Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 40, No. 3. By Janet Browne Biographies of scientists are generating fresh interest as current movements in the historiography of science increasingly focus on the social aspects of science and on the criteria that most accurately describe a scientific life. Biography...
An exploration of the juxtaposition of professional and political accountability in local law enforcement management
International Journal of Police Science & Management, Vol. 12, p. 90-118. By Casey LaFrance and Jennifer M Allen This study focuses on one arena of public administration in which the balancing act between various accountability considerations is especially visible: local law enforcement management, and one of the many accountability...
PROPORTIONATE LOVE AND LITERATURE: THE REVENGE OF THE ***
Heythrop Journal, Vol. 51, p. 84-86. ByPatrick Madigan The article reports that the conviction that love is likely to be proportionate to its object was basic to Greek ethics and culture. As reported, Aristotle precipitated this conviction into a principle and analyzed moral virtue as the...
CONFUCIUS AND MENCIUS ON THE MOTIVATION TO BE MORAL
Philosophy East & West, Vol. 60, p. 65-87. By Yong Huang Focusing on the Analects and the Mencius, this article attempts to provide a Confucian answer to "why be moral?"—a question about the motivation to be moral that is neither tautological nor self-contradictory, as some philosophers...
The Virtue of Simplicity
Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, Vol. 23, p. 85. By Joshua Colt Gambrel and Philip Cafaro "In this paper we explore material simplicity, defined as the virtue disposing us to act appropriately within the sphere of our consumer decisions. Simplicity is a conscientious and restrained attitude toward...
Sex, sexuality and negotiating Africanness in Nairobi
Africa: The Journal of the International African Institute, Vol. 79, No. 4. By Rachel Spronk This article presents two themes: how young professionals personally experience sexuality and issues of cultural belonging or identification; and how these issues are interrelated in their lives. I identify ways in which ‘young professionals...
Darfur: Strategic Victimhood Strikes Again?
Genocide Studies and Prevention, Vol. 4, No. 3. By Alan J. Kuperman Although most humanitarians advocate more international intervention in Darfur, some analysts urge the opposite on grounds that intervention has backfired due to the problem of moral hazard. These contrarians argue that the expectation...
Culture and Embodied Cognition: Moral Discourses in Internet Support Groups for Overeaters
Social Forces, Volume 88, Number 2, pp. 643-669. By Gabriel Ignatow. This article argues that a modified version of Bourdieu's habitus concept can generate insights into moral culture and the ways people use culture to make changes in their lives. If revised in light of recent findings from cognitive...
Listening to Rap: Cultures of Crime, Cultures of Resistance
Social Forces, Volume 88, Number 2, pp. 693-722. By Julian Tanner, Mark Asbridge and Scot Wortley. This research compares representations of rap music with the self-reported criminal behavior and resistant attitudes of the music's core audience. Our database is a large sample of Toronto high school...
From Thick to Thin: Two Moral Reduction Plans
Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 39, Number 4, pp. 515-535. By Daniel Y. Elstein and Thomas Hurka. "Many philosophers of the last century thought all moral judgments can be expressed using a few basic concepts — what are today called ‘thin’ moral concepts such as ‘good,’ ‘bad,’ ‘right,’ and ‘wrong.’ This...
"Your Cell will Teach You Everything" Old Wisdom, Modern Science, and the Art of Attention
Buddhist-Christian Studies, Volume 29, pp. 83-88. By Noreen Herzfed Sit in your cell and your cell will teach you everything. Few of us live the monastic life. We spend our days in a world of work filled with technologies that vie for our attention. And we return at the end of those days, not to a cell...
The Making and Unmaking of Prejudice, An Interchange between Psychology and Religion
Journal of Religion & Society, Volume 11. By Wioleta Polinska Whether compassion for all beings in Buddhism, or “love of enemy” in Christianity, unconditional love signifies one of the principal concerns of all world religions. The profound wisdom of various religious traditions has inspired...
Coleridge's Uncertain Agony
SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900, Volume 49, Number 4, pp. 807-839 . By Harry White Coleridge realized that much of the guilt from which he suffered was largely—if not entirely—a symptom of depression; but he found the possibility that feelings of guilt might be reducible to symptoms of mental disease even more disturbing...
Education in the Virtues: Tragic Emotions and the Artistic Imagination
The Journal of Aesthetic Education, Volume 43, Number 4, pp. 9-31 . By Derek L Penwell The profoundly thoughtful—not to mention extensive—character of the scholarship historically applied to the nature of the difference between Plato and Aristotle on the issue of the tragic emotions raises the obvious question: What new...
Personality, Identity, and Character, Explorations in Moral Psychology
Cambridge University Press Edited by Darcia Narvaez "Moral notions are foundational questions that have commanded deep reflection since antiquity, reflection that psychological science cannot evade, because the moral formation of children is a central concern of parents, schools...
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University of Chicago

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Graduate Student

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Research Interests

Early Christian History in the Western Roman Empire Role of Emotion in Fourth-Century Christian scholars

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