Tag Search Results: ethics + biological sciences
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NEWS
  • Unraveling Virtues

    By Greg Borzo, UChicago News An excerpt: That the new study of virtues has come to embrace a systematic, organized body of knowledge was evident at the third annual conference of the New Science of Virtues project at the University of Chicago, March 14-16, 2012. “The rigorous scientific method can be...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • This is Your Brain on No Self Control

    From Science Daily An excerpt: A study by University of Iowa neuroscientist and neuro-marketing expert William Hedgcock confirms previous studies that show self-control is a finite commodity that is depleted by use. Once the pool has dried up, we're less likely to keep our cool the next time we're...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Laurie Santos and the Hard Science of Monkey Business

    By Amy Dockser Marcus, Wall Street Journal online Some scientists find inspiration in the lab. Others trek into the field. Laurie Santos likes the local coffee house. The 36-year-old runs Yale University's Comparative Cognition Laboratory, which examines the origins of the human mind by studying...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • The Ick Factor of Moral Revulsion

    Moral Disgust Carries Foul Flavour, Researchers Say By Misty Harris in The Montreal Gazette Moral revulsion literally leaves a bad taste in people's mouths, a new study suggests. Researchers have found that some people of Christian faith were more likely to describe a lemon-water drink as disgusting...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Can Babies Teach Us About Morality?

    By Jenny Mardner, The Rundown- PBS/Science Nation Summary: What can one baby, three puppets and a tricky Tupperware lid tell us about the roots of morality? Can infants distinguish between good and bad at such a young age? NewsHour science correspondent Miles O'Brien reports on research being conducted...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • The Evolution of Prejudice

    By Daisy Grewal, Scientific American Mind 4/5/11 An excerpt: Psychologists have long known that many people are prejudiced towards others based on group affiliations, be they racial, ethnic, religious, or even political. However, we know far less about why people are prone to prejudice in the first place...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • The Social Animal

    By David Brooks, The New Yorker 1/17/11 Harold and Erica got their first glimpse of each other in front of a Barnes & Noble. They smiled broadly as they approached, and a deep, primeval process kicked in. Harold liked what he saw, from the waist-to-hip ratio to the clear skin, all indicative of health...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • And Man Made Life: Artificial Life, the Stuff of Dreams and Nightmares, Has Arrived

    From The Economist To create life is the prerogative of gods. Deep in the human psyche, whatever the rational pleadings of physics and chemistry, there exists a sense that biology is different, is more than just the sum of atoms moving about and reacting with one another, is somehow infused with a divine...
     Posted by: cait
  • Fertile Old Ladies

    By William Saletan | Slate "Is it OK to impregnate a 60-year-old woman? Should old women have babies? Until recently, this wasn't an issue. Nature exhausted your egg supply, and that was it. But technology has surmounted that problem. Now you can get in vitro fertilization, donor eggs, and womb...
     Posted by: ajstasic
  • The Origin of Hatred

    By Katherine Harmon | Scientific American "If love is said to come from the heart, what about hate? Along with music, religion, irony and a host of other complex concepts, researchers are on the hunt for the neurological underpinnings of hatred. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has begun...
     Posted by: ajstasic
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PUBLICATIONS
  • Dementia May Change How You Think About Moral Dilemmas (2011)

    The role of social cognition in moral judgment in frontotemporal dementia. By Ezequiel Gleichgerrcht, Teresa Torralva, Maria Roca, Mariángeles Pose, and Facundo Manes. Abstract: The role of social cognition in moral judgment in frontotemporal dementia. Abstract: Patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Moral Controversy, Directive Counsel, and the Doctor's Role: Findings From a National Survey of Obstetrician-Gynecologists (2010)

    By John D. Yoon, M.D.; Kenneth A. Rasinski, M.D.; and Farr A. Curlin, M.D. "...Providing nondirective counsel to their patients appears to have become the norm among certain obstetrician–gynecologists in the United States, particularly when dealing with morally controversial medical decisions. These...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Friendship: Development, Ecology and Evolution of a Relationship (2010) (2010)

    Friends-they are generous and cooperative with each other in ways that appear to defy standard evolutionary expectations, frequently sacrificing for one another without concern for past behaviors or future consequences. In this fascinating multidisciplinary study, Daniel J. Hruschka synthesizes an array...
    (My publication) Posted by: Hruschka
  • What Are Parents For?: Reproductive Ethics after the Nonidentity Problem (2010)

    By Bernard G. Prusak Bioethicists often use the “nonidentity problem”—the idea that a child born with a disability would actually be a different child if she were born without the disability—to defend parents’ rights to have whatever children they want. After all, a child is not harmed by being brought...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: cait
  • Is There an Ethical Problem Here? (2010)

    By John A. Robertson Egg donation fills an important niche in American infertility practice. It helps women with ovarian failure, women over forty, and gay men to have children. It does so, to a large extent, because donors are paid for their services. Some people, however, are uncomfortable with paying...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: cait
  • Morality De-Kanted or the Biological Roots of Moral Behavior (2000)

    Abstract: The ethical and moral behavior of Homo sapiens is no longer the exclusive domain of religion and philosophy because we recognize that such behavior affects the reproductive success of individuals within the species. We are a social species and therefore our survival is influenced by our capacity...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: admin
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DISCUSSIONS
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