Tag Search Results: neuroscience + morality
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NEWS
  • Jailbreak Rat: Selfless Rodents Spring Their Pals and Share Their Sweets

    By Ferris Jabr, Scientific American An excerpt: The English language is not especially kind to rats. We say we "smell a rat" when something doesn't feel right, refer to stressful competition as the "rat race," and scorn traitors who "rat on" friends. But rats don't...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • The Future of Moral Machines

    By Colin Allen, New York Times A robot walks into a bar and says, “I’ll have a screwdriver.” A bad joke, indeed. But even less funny if the robot says “Give me what’s in your cash register.” The fictional theme of robots turning against humans is older than the word itself, which first appeared in the...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Human Nature’s Pathologist

    By Carl Zimmer, New York Times Steven Pinker was a 15-year-old anarchist. He didn’t think people needed a police force to keep the peace. Governments caused the very problems they were supposed to solve. Besides, it was 1969, said Dr. Pinker, who is now a 57-year-old psychologist at Harvard. “If you...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Moral Choice or Tug of War?

    The Vexing Mental Tug-of-War Called Morality By Kristin Ohlson, Discover magazine Would you kill a crying baby to save yourself and others from hostile soldiers outside? Neuroscience offers new ways to approach such moral questions, allowing logic to triumph over deep-rooted instinct. You arrive at the...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Patricia Churchland and Her New Book, Braintrust

    Video from The Science Network Patricia Churchland is one of the most interesting public intellectuals of our time. Since the publication in 1986 of her seminal book “Neurophilosophy”, which began to explain the neural underpinnings of an enormous tradition of philosophy, Churchland has been a major...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • What is a Good Life?

    By Ronald Dworkin, The New York Review of Books Plato and Aristotle treated morality as a genre of interpretation. They tried to show the true character of each of the main moral and political virtues (such as honor, civic responsibility, and justice), first by relating each to the others, and then to...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Trust in the Twitterverse

    by Evan Lerner from Seed Magazine "Today, down in the descriptively named Research Triangle in North Carolina, more than 250 scientists, journalists, bloggers, programmers, and multi-hyphenated combinations thereof are planning the future of science communication on the web. (Practicing what it...
     Posted by: nick stock
  • Moral thinking: Biology invades a field philosophers thought was safely theirs

    Considering morality from viewpoints other than philosophy is becoming more and more common. This article from The Economist describes a panel discussion focusing on what biology has to offer in the debate about morality. Source: The Economist "Whence morality? That is a question which has troubled...
     Posted by: admin
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PUBLICATIONS
  • Moral Universals and Individual Differences (2011)

    By Liane Young and Rebecca Saxe Abstract: Contemporary moral psychology has focused on the notion of a universal moral sense, robust to individual and cultural differences. Yet recent evidence has revealed individual differences in the psychological processes for moral judgment: controlled cognition...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Magnets and Moral Judgments (2011)

    Disruption of the right temporoparietal junction with transcranial magnetic stimulation reduces the role of beliefs in moral judgments By Liane Young, Joan Albert Camprodon, Marc Hauser, Alvaro Pascual-Leone, and Rebecca Saxe Abstract: When we judge an action as morally right or wrong, we rely on our...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Thick Concepts and the Moral Brain (2011)

    By Gabriel Abend Drawing on Williams’ distinction between thin and thick ethical concepts, I argue that current moral neuroscience and psychology unwarrantedly restrict their researches to thin morality only. Experiments typically investigate subjects’ judgments about rightness, appropriateness, or permissibility...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Blind ethics: Closing one’s eyes polarizes moral judgments and discourages dishonest behavior. (2011)

    By Eugene Caruso & Francesca Gino Abstract: Four experiments demonstrate that closing one's eyes affects ethical judgment and behavior because it induces people to mentally simulate events more extensively. People who considered situations with their eyes closed rather than open judged immoral...
    (My publication) Posted by: agomberg
  • Responsibility and the Brain Sciences (2009)

    Felipe De Brigard, Eric Mandelbaum, David Ripley Some theorists think that the more we get to know about the neural underpinnings of our behaviors, the less likely we will be to hold people responsible for their actions. This intuition has driven some to suspect that as neuroscience gains insight into...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: nick stock
  • Neural Correlates of Human Virtue Judgment (2008)

    Abstract: Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that the brain regions implicated in moral cognition. However, those studies have focused exclusively on violation of social norms and negative moral emotions, and very little effort has been expended on the investigation of positive reactions to moral...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: admin
  • Christian Ethics and the Moral Psychologies (2006)

    Abstract: Interest in the insights of psychology has become part of our culture. Psychological solutions are advanced for a whole host of moral dilemmas. How should an ethically-minded Christian include insights from such disciplines as psychoanalysis, cognitive moral development and neuroscience in...
    (My publication) Posted by: dsbrowni
  • The Neural Correlates of Moral Sensitivity: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Investigation of Basic and Moral Emotions (2002)

    Abstract: Humans are endowed with a natural sense of fairness that permeates social perceptions and interactions. This moral stance is so ubiquitous that we may not notice it as a fundamental component of daily decision making and in the workings of many legal, political, and social systems. Emotion...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: admin
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DISCUSSIONS
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