Tag Search Results: philosophy + morality
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NEWS
  • Notes on Virtue

    By Peter Lawler, The Big Think An excerpt: So we've basically completed our two-year series of conferences, publications, and such at Berry College funded by a grant from the Science of Virtues project at the University of Chicago. My concluding presentation—following directions—is about saying what...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Why We Have Moral Rules, But Don't Follow Them

    From New Scientist WHY do we sometimes wrestle with moral dilemmas? A twist on a classic psychology experiment suggests that our minds have two parallel moral systems, and they don't always agree. In the trolley experiment, participants are told that a runaway tram trolley could kill five people...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Human Nature’s Pathologist

    By Carl Zimmer, New York Times Steven Pinker was a 15-year-old anarchist. He didn’t think people needed a police force to keep the peace. Governments caused the very problems they were supposed to solve. Besides, it was 1969, said Dr. Pinker, who is now a 57-year-old psychologist at Harvard. “If you...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Virtuous Empathy: Scientific and Humanistic Investigations

    Virtues News: The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions presents Virtuous Empathy: Scientific and Humanistic Investigations. Indiana University has received a grant from the University of Chicago (sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation) to study "Virtuous Empathy:...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Morality Play

    From TPM (The Philosopher's Magazine) In this activity you will be presented with 19 different scenarios. In each case, you will be asked to make a judgment about what is the morally right thing to do. When you have answered all the questions, you will be presented with an analysis of your responses...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Why Free Will May be an Illusion

    By MacGregor Campbell, New Scientist Does free will actually exist? Or are we all just biological robots? In this video, see why modern neuroscience claims free will is an illusion and why psychology experiments suggest we may be better off believing the lie. Controlling our own destiny is so ingrained...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • What is a Good Life?

    By Ronald Dworkin, The New York Review of Books Plato and Aristotle treated morality as a genre of interpretation. They tried to show the true character of each of the main moral and political virtues (such as honor, civic responsibility, and justice), first by relating each to the others, and then to...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • An Unconventional History of Human Rights

    PBS By David E. Anderson An excerpt: In a provocative and contrarian new book, “The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History” (Harvard University Press, 2010), Columbia University professor Samuel Moyn outlines the moral and political dilemmas in which the movement currently finds itself, describing his...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • The Science of Good and Evil

    By Sam Harris from The Daily Beast. " As I argue in my new book, The Moral Landscape , questions about values—about meaning, morality, and life’s larger purpose—are really questions about the well-being of conscious creatures. Throughout the book I make reference to a hypothetical space that I call...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Experiments in Philosophy

    By Joshua Knobe from The New York Times. "...The study of human nature, whether in Nietzsche or in a contemporary psychology journal, is obviously relevant to certain purely scientific questions, but how could this sort of work ever help us to answer the distinctive questions of philosophy? It may...
     Posted by: agomberg
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PUBLICATIONS
  • Time for Love: The Place of Marriage and Children in the Thought of Stanley Hauerwas (2012)

    By Gilbert Meilaender In essays written throughout his career, Stanley Hauerwas has unfolded a Christian vision of the marriage bond and the presence of children that seeks insistently to place these seemingly natural bonds within the new family of God that is the church. I examine his understanding...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Review of Stan van Hooft, Hope (2012)

    By Nancy Snow An excerpt: In five chapters, an introduction, and a short epilogue, Stan van Hooft conveys in highly readable and non-technical prose most of what is important about hope. He distinguishes hope from hopefulness, and uses the Aristotelian template of virtue as a mean between extremes to...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • The Possibility of Virtue (2012)

    To have a virtue is to possess a certain kind of trait of character that is appropriate in pursuing the moral good at which the virtue aims. Human beings are assumed to be capable of attaining those traits. Yet, a number of scholars are skeptical about the very existence of such character traits. They...
    (My publication) Posted by: malzola
  • Moral Universals and Individual Differences (2011)

    By Liane Young and Rebecca Saxe Abstract: Contemporary moral psychology has focused on the notion of a universal moral sense, robust to individual and cultural differences. Yet recent evidence has revealed individual differences in the psychological processes for moral judgment: controlled cognition...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Utilitarian? Maybe Antisocial, Too. (2011)

    The Mismeasure of Morals: Antisocial Personality Traits Predict Utilitarian Responses to Moral Dilemmas By Daniel M. Bartels and David A. Pizzaro Researchers have recently argued that utilitarianism is the appropriate framework by which to evaluate moral judgment, and that individuals who endorse non...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Thick Concepts and the Moral Brain (2011)

    By Gabriel Abend Drawing on Williams’ distinction between thin and thick ethical concepts, I argue that current moral neuroscience and psychology unwarrantedly restrict their researches to thin morality only. Experiments typically investigate subjects’ judgments about rightness, appropriateness, or permissibility...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Virtue Ethics and Confucian Ethics (2011)

    By Chen Lai Abstract: This essay focuses on the unity of several virtues in pre-Qin Confucians. Confucius maintains the proper application and coherence of such virtues as benevolence, wisdom, trustworthiness, straightforwardness, courage, and firmness. Further, Confucius takes benevolence and nobility...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Justice as a Self-Regarding Virtue (2011)

    By Paul Bloomfield Abstract: Justice has long stood out among the virtues as being an “other-regarding” virtue. As Michael Thompson writes, “The mark of this special virtue of human agents [justice], as Aristotle says, is that it is “toward another”, pros heteron or pros allon; it is, as St. Thomas says...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Moral Motivation Pluralism (2010)

    By Ragnar Francén "Motivational externalists and internalists of various sorts disagree about the circumstances under which it is conceptually possible to have moral opinions but lack moral motivation. Typically, the evidence referred to are intuitions about whether people in certain scenarios who...
    (My publication) Posted by: ajstasic
  • The Rationality of Ultimate Concern: Moral Exemplars, Theological Ethics, and the Science of Moral Cognition (2010)

    By Gregory R. Peterson, Michael Spezio, James Van Slyke, Kevin Reimer and Warren Brown This paper argues that consideration of moral exemplars may provide a means for integrating insights across philosophical ethics, theological ethics, and the scientific study of moral cognition. Key to this endeavor...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: cait
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DISCUSSIONS
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