Tag Search Results: philosophy + neuroscience
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NEWS
  • Human Nature’s Pathologist

    By Carl Zimmer, New York Times Steven Pinker was a 15-year-old anarchist. He didn’t think people needed a police force to keep the peace. Governments caused the very problems they were supposed to solve. Besides, it was 1969, said Dr. Pinker, who is now a 57-year-old psychologist at Harvard. “If you...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • What is a Good Life?

    By Ronald Dworkin, The New York Review of Books Plato and Aristotle treated morality as a genre of interpretation. They tried to show the true character of each of the main moral and political virtues (such as honor, civic responsibility, and justice), first by relating each to the others, and then to...
     Posted by: agomberg
  • Trust in the Twitterverse

    by Evan Lerner from Seed Magazine "Today, down in the descriptively named Research Triangle in North Carolina, more than 250 scientists, journalists, bloggers, programmers, and multi-hyphenated combinations thereof are planning the future of science communication on the web. (Practicing what it...
     Posted by: nick stock
  • Moral thinking: Biology invades a field philosophers thought was safely theirs

    Considering morality from viewpoints other than philosophy is becoming more and more common. This article from The Economist describes a panel discussion focusing on what biology has to offer in the debate about morality. Source: The Economist "Whence morality? That is a question which has troubled...
     Posted by: admin
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PUBLICATIONS
  • Moral Universals and Individual Differences (2011)

    By Liane Young and Rebecca Saxe Abstract: Contemporary moral psychology has focused on the notion of a universal moral sense, robust to individual and cultural differences. Yet recent evidence has revealed individual differences in the psychological processes for moral judgment: controlled cognition...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Thick Concepts and the Moral Brain (2011)

    By Gabriel Abend Drawing on Williams’ distinction between thin and thick ethical concepts, I argue that current moral neuroscience and psychology unwarrantedly restrict their researches to thin morality only. Experiments typically investigate subjects’ judgments about rightness, appropriateness, or permissibility...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • A Conceptual and Computational Model of Moral Decision Making in Human and Artificial Agents (2011)

    By Wendell Wallach, Stan Franklin, and Colin Allen Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in general, comprehensive models of human cognition. Such models aim to explain higher-order cognitive faculties, such as deliberation and planning. Given a computational representation, the validity...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: agomberg
  • Responsibility and the Brain Sciences (2009)

    Felipe De Brigard, Eric Mandelbaum, David Ripley Some theorists think that the more we get to know about the neural underpinnings of our behaviors, the less likely we will be to hold people responsible for their actions. This intuition has driven some to suspect that as neuroscience gains insight into...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: nick stock
  • An Integrated View of Empathy: Psychology, Philosophy, and Neuroscience (2009)

    Abstract: In this paper, we will examine and untangle a conflict mainly between a developmental psychologist, Martin Hoffman and a social psychologist, Daniel Batson. According to Hoffman, empathic distress, a vicarious feeling through empathy, is transformed into an altruistic motivation. Batson and...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: admin
  • An fMRI Investigation of Emotional Engagement in Moral Judgment (2001)

    Abstract: The long-standing rationalist tradition in moral psychology emphasizes the role of reason in moral judgment. A more recent trend places increased emphasis on emotion. Although both reason and emotion are likely to play important roles in moral judgment, relatively little is known about their...
    (Something interesting I found) Posted by: admin
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